A VISUAL LIFE | Creative Direction + Design

Tag: art

MASTERSTROKE // colour block

Pardon the pun but I couldn’t help myself! Wandering around suburban ‘blocks’ to find this gorgeous art using ‘colour blocking’ turned out to be a perfect combination. This was a fashion trend where an outfit revolves around a palette of multiple solid colours, usually in bold and bright shades.

The first image in Rozelle has window-like panels with murals of people peeking out to reveal themselves or parts of their faces. Painting these in black and white gives them contrast and depth to the colourful background. The second photo is in Ultimo and is an architectural piece reflecting the surrounding city buildings. Located on the industrial historic site of the former rail line, it has now been converted to a pedestrian pathway and cycle way known as The Goods Line. These graphic and abstract designs follow the ‘colour block’ style and brighten up these walls while adding character to the area.

 

MASTERSTROKE // quilty

‘Self-portrait after Afghanistan’, 2012 (oil on linen)

‘Fairy Bower Rorschach’, 2012 (oil on linen)

‘Margaret Olley’, 2011 (oil on linen)

‘Bedford Downs Rorschach’, 2008 (oil on linen)

There are only a few days left to see the latest exhibition from one of Australia’s most acclaimed contemporary artists (and one of my personal favourites). Ben Quilty’s last decade of work is showcased in multiple rooms at the Art Gallery of NSW, taking you on an expressive journey on how he sees the world. This quote from Quilty himself reflects his social conscience – “My work is about working out how to live in this world, it’s about compassion and empathy but also anger and resistance. Through it I hope to push compassion to the front of national debate.”

His powerful brushstrokes and vibrant colours evoke strong emotions with the content tackling serious issues and reflecting his political views on the injustices in our society. He has campaigned for inmates, refugees and veterans, visually representing their plights and telling their stories. He was also an official war artist in Afghanistan and these paintings in particular show the pain and torment in facial expressions in his renowned vivid style.

Margaret Olley is also one of my treasured Australian artists so seeing Quilty’s intimate portrait of her that won the 2011 Archibald Prize is a special experience. I particularly love his account of her – “Her lack of ego is so appealing. Margaret didn’t understand why anyone would want to see a portrait of her. She’s such an inspiration. She was a feminist ahead of her time. She’s vigorously passionate about social and political issues, as well as art, and is enormously compassionate. Margaret has such an infectious attitude to both life and death.”

A real standout was the room displaying Quilty’s ‘Rorschach’ landscapes which are inspired by Hermann Rorschach’s ink blots used for psychological testing. This series is mesmerising and Quilty used the method of applying thick layers of oil paint, pressing the still-wet panels into six unpainted panels to create a mirror of the original. Documenting significant events in our dark colonial history by depicting areas such as Myall Creek where Indigenous tribes were attacked in a massacre. Ben Quilty shows the juxtaposition of the picturesque with the turbulence of trauma through the blotted, stain effect. Quilty’s art is as confronting as his subject matter and his bold use of paint represents his strong ethics and viewpoints.

INSTA-JAM // farewell 2019

           

Not only is it the end of 2019 but we are also closing off the decade and saying farewell to the 2010s. For many of us it has been a big year with changes, decisions and some turmoil. This uneasy environment has been playing out on the world stage, especially in politics and climate change issues. We still have to focus on the beauty of life and here are the monthly highlights from my Instagram that I hope will reflect some positive vibes. In Australia it’s very tough at the moment with the summer heatwave creating a bushfire crisis. Growing up beside a national park and experiencing this many times first hand, I know what a tough and stressful situation it is to live through. My thoughts go out to all the people affected and in particular the brave firefighters defending homes and protecting lives. I’m using my Christmas wishes for the fires to end soon, bring plenty of rain, safe holidays for everyone and a better start to 2020.

STREETSCAPES // work inc

Coworking spaces are rapidly growing in popularity and it’s no surprise since the way we work has changed so much. The rise of contractors, freelancers and startup businesses has proven that there’s a need for more flexible options. Individuals and small companies have embraced this office revolution because of the versatility of coworking sites. Many premises have 24/7 access which makes it convenient for people to choose their own hours and work during their most productive times. Working on your own can feel isolating, so having the chance to meet and socialise with others is an advantage. Not only can you get the interaction and support you normally wouldn’t have by being solo, it’s also a great way to network and collaborate.

Work inc is a truly unique space in Lavender Bay, at the base of the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge. The heritage site was designed by BJB Architects and Brenchley Architects who have preserved the 100 year old raw, industrial look of the historic warehouses. There are 4 sections from Bay 6 to Bay 10 with designated zones in each bay to cater for every need. Providing private offices, permanent desks, meeting rooms, boardrooms, break-out areas, event zones and even a podcast studio. There’s also the award winning Bay Ten Espresso which serves great food and coffee. Having a café on-site is convenient and is also perfect as an informal spot to meet.

The interiors are cool with the prominent re-purposed shipping container elevator dominating the space. The heritage-listed arches, exposed concrete walls and stunning windows showcase the original architecture of the building. These rustic elements are contrasted with modern steel structures and glass pods. Artistic touches abound with murals and quirky decorating details which are creative and inspiring. This is truly an example of how an imaginative vision can create a fun working environment while forming a community of it’s own.

HOUSE CALL // the ideal home

Douglas Snelling chair and foot stool, 1957 (timber and synthetic webbing); Douglas Snelling cabinet, 1949 (timber); George Nelson ‘Bubble’ lamp, 1947-70s (plastic and metal)

Robin Boyd ‘House of Tomorrow’, designed 1949 (model made 1992)

Wolfgang Sievers ‘House of Tomorrow’ photographs, 1949 (printed 1990)

Grant and Mary Featherston ‘Numero IV’ lounge suite, 1973-74 (polyurethane foam, ABS plastic and wool); Grant and Mary Featherston dining setting, 1969 (stem, plastic, timber, metal, rubber and fabric); Korban/Flaubert ‘Swaylamp’ floor lamp, 2002 (background); Marc Newson ‘Helice’ floor lamp, 1993 (foreground)

Catherine O’Donnell ‘Sirius Topography (series)’, 2018 (3M vinyl tape 471)

Mid century modern style made a comeback years ago and it’s not going away any time soon and for good reason – great design. I recently saw The Ideal Home exhibition and although it’s very small, it’s worth it if you’re in the area (there’s a larger second site at MAAS Powerhouse in Ultimo). The exhibit shows a slice of history with examples of what a 20th century Australian home looked like with furnishings and household items from the MAAS Collection.

In this era Australia had one of the highest rates of home ownership in the world and suburbs grew quickly. Modern technology and mass manufacturing made goods readily available to consumers and time saving products allowed more leisure. While modernist designers created trends in architecture, interiors and design internationally, Australian pioneers made their own mark. Architect Robin Boyd’s creations are featured as well as iconic furniture designers Grant and Mary Featherston.

Another interesting and unexpected element was the installation of drawings of the Sirius brutalist apartment block. I’ve written before about the threat of redevelopment that the iconic building is facing in my Save Our Sirius post. Catherine O’Donnell has covered the walls with tape outlines of the Sirius footprint, floor plans and elevations to showcase this treasure in a fresh way.

Australians embraced mid century modern as it represented comfort, style and function. 100 years later it is a lifestyle that we still aspire to today.

INSTA-JAM // 2018 flew

        

Usually I post a visual diary and show a snapshot from each month at the end of the year, but 2018 flew by and before you know it we’re at the end of January 2019. It’s a little late but here are some highlights from my Instagram that I hope you enjoy and feel free to browse my feed. I have to say that I used to be much more consistent and I think we all go through that social media fatigue at some stage. It is still a great medium to express yourself and connect with people but I’m taking Marie Kondo’s ‘KonMari’ approach – only if it sparks joy!

%d bloggers like this: