A VISUAL LIFE | Creative Direction + Design

Tag: photography

STREETSCAPES // industrial pyrmont

Pyrmont was home to the Eora people but soon became an industrial hub as Sydney grew as a colony. Originally established as a sandstone quarry until more industries were introduced such as a sugar refinery. During this expansion many warehouses were built to house these businesses. In the 1800’s, the suburb was also densely populated due to the local workers living in the lovely terraces you can still see today.

Darling Island Bond & Free Store is a beautiful brick structure that has fallen into disrepair. This site began as the Australian Thermite Company Pty Ltd and was roughly built in the early 1900’s. Thermite was a metal oxide mix used for welding, commonly on trains and rail tracks in that period. It changed occupants a couple of decades later and you can still see the faded signage with the painted lettering for Bond & Free Store.

Arrow Marine building was designed by Sydney Harbour Trust’s Chief Engineer, H D Walsh, who changed the face of the harbour waterfront at the time. It was built in 1917, at the same time as the adjacent wharves and was used as a dockside garage and facility for the workmen. This significant building is important as it shows early 20th century design as well as being functional. It is also the only known surviving wharf structure of its type in Sydney with the original timber gable.

In the last decade this area has had major redevelopment with high rise apartment blocks changing the historic landscape. Luckily there are still some traces of this rich history and while some sites have heritage protection, my biggest fear is that more buildings like these will be lost in the future.

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MASTERSTROKE // robert mapplethorpe

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ABOVE: ‘Self-portrait’, 1980 (gelatin silver); ‘Self-portrait’, 1983 (gelatin silver); ‘Self-portrait’, 1980 (gelatin silver). BELOW: ‘Patti Smith’, 1979 (gelatin silver); ‘Marianne Faithfull’, 1974 (gelatin silver).

 

BELOW: ‘Deborah Harry’, 1978 (gelatin silver); ‘David Hockney’, 1976 (gelatin silver). BOTTOM: ‘Isabella Rossellini’, 1988 (gelatin silver); ‘Lucy Ferry’, 1986 (gelatin silver).

 

I wish I had a chance to post this before the exhibition closed but life just got in the way. Perfectly timed with the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras, the renowned work of Robert Mapplethorpe: the perfect medium was on show at the Art Gallery of NSW. He was a controversial figure who pushed boundaries and his art was ground breaking. His black and white photography is legendary but it was inspiring to see some of his work that I wasn’t familiar with. Being a designer, it was also nice to see some of the graphic examples from gay publications he collaborated with.

An enclosed room housed the more erotic images as well as his published books – X, Y and Z Portfolios. This three part book series details homosexual sadomasochistic imagery (X), floral still lifes (Y) and nude portraits of African-American men (Z). I loved the sculptural and evocative florals, shot in bold colour with a meticulous play of light and shadows. He was famous for celebrating the human form and his involvement in New York’s gay scene cultivated this, but his contemporary images also caused outrage.

His artistic methods and personal life are also detailed which is fascinating. Robert was friends with famous artists and musicians who he photographed regularly, including his muse Patti Smith. I idolised these icons so I couldn’t go past sharing them here and imagining the story behind each setting. Robert Mapplethorpe had an amazing but tragically short life, although he lives on in his pictures and as he would say ‘perfection in form’.

INSTA-JAM // sending off 2017

          

I admit I have been slack and absent from social media in 2017 but it has been a huge year! It’s been great but extremely hectic on all fronts (home, family and work) so I’m definitely needing a well earned rest. It will be a short break as 2018 is gearing up to be a time with lots of changes coming, which is exciting. Here’s a few highlights from my Instagram that I shared (albeit sporadically). I hope you have all had a good year and the upcoming one is even better. Happy holidays!

STREETSCAPES // goddard street

There are plenty of streets and laneways in Newtown filled with street art but Goddard Street is one of my favourite spots. I love how the whole walls are covered in artworks all lined up like an art gallery space. Works by various artists with different styles and themes create an interesting mix. They do change around so it’s always worth having a stroll to see how it’s evolved from the last time. These photos were taken awhile ago so I’m definitely due to do another shoot soon.

HOUSE CALL // save our sirius

Sirius is an iconic apartment building in The Rocks that is a perfect representation of brutalist architecture. It was designed by architect Tao Gofers and built in 1979 for the Housing Commission for public housing tenants. It’s prime location next to the Sydney Harbour Bridge with views of Circular Quay and the Sydney Opera House make it an enviable site. In 2014, the New South Wales Government decided to sell the block of 79 units along with many Millers Point heritage-listed terraces, possibly for demolition to make way for luxury apartments. Despite protests from tenants, locals and architectural lovers, nearly all the residents have now moved out of Sirius. The Government decided against heritage listing despite a recommendation by the Heritage Council, but this will be challenged at a hearing at the NSW Land and Environment Court in April.

Tao Gofers has hosted tours of Sirius to try to get more support from the community by opening up the apartments to the public and educating people about the significance of social housing. Peaceful protests have also been held to show the Government how much this building means to Sydneysiders. Comedian and radio presenter Tim “Rosso” Ross has also been instrumental in organising the campaign Save Our Sirius.

Tonight a rally was held on site for people to have Friday drinks to appreciate the building but also to raise awareness. Since Tao Gofers started his tours, the building’s windows have been blocked out by the NSW Department of Family and Community Services. The beautiful interiors and foyer artwork by artist Penny Rosier is now sadly hidden from view. It was a great crowd full of supporters who respect the historic value of Sirius and who want the best for our city and the people.

 

STREETSCAPES // the rocks

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Being a local in Sydney you can sometimes take the beauty of the city for granted. When I recently spent a day playing tourist it opened my eyes again. The Rocks has heritage elements everywhere with sandstone walls chiselled by convicts and cobbled laneways once frequented by settlers, sailors and soldiers. You can picture what life must have been like over 200 years ago by exploring the heritage buildings and some of the oldest pubs in Australia.

This historic precinct is a colourful mix of the past and present, with plenty to see and do. Food festivals are held here regularly, but new bars and restaurants are adding to the cultural scene. While the weekly markets, art galleries and museums have always made it a creative hub. It’s a great spot to wander around, make discoveries and have a history lesson while having fun along the way.

 

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