A VISUAL LIFE | Creative Direction + Design

Tag: style

STREETSCAPES // work inc

Coworking spaces are rapidly growing in popularity and it’s no surprise since the way we work has changed so much. The rise of contractors, freelancers and startup businesses has proven that there’s a need for more flexible options. Individuals and small companies have embraced this office revolution because of the versatility of coworking sites. Many premises have 24/7 access which makes it convenient for people to choose their own hours and work during their most productive times. Working on your own can feel isolating, so having the chance to meet and socialise with others is an advantage. Not only can you get the interaction and support you normally wouldn’t have by being solo, it’s also a great way to network and collaborate.

Work inc is a truly unique space in Lavender Bay, at the base of the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge. The heritage site was designed by BJB Architects and Brenchley Architects who have preserved the 100 year old raw, industrial look of the historic warehouses. There are 4 sections from Bay 6 to Bay 10 with designated zones in each bay to cater for every need. Providing private offices, permanent desks, meeting rooms, boardrooms, break-out areas, event zones and even a podcast studio. There’s also the award winning Bay Ten Espresso which serves great food and coffee. Having a café on-site is convenient and is also perfect as an informal spot to meet.

The interiors are cool with the prominent re-purposed shipping container elevator dominating the space. The heritage-listed arches, exposed concrete walls and stunning windows showcase the original architecture of the building. These rustic elements are contrasted with modern steel structures and glass pods. Artistic touches abound with murals and quirky decorating details which are creative and inspiring. This is truly an example of how an imaginative vision can create a fun working environment while forming a community of it’s own.

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TUCKER TIME // interior inspo

The main reason for dining out is eating good food and enjoying the company of family and friends. Atmosphere can make or break a restaurant, no matter how great the meal is. For me the interiors are also a major part of the experience and a constant source of inspiration and design ideas.

I’m hoping to renovate in the future so I’m already thinking about what I could do with my home. I know the Hamptons style has been overdone but since I’m by the water I feel like I need to pay homage with a little coastal chic. Santorini’s whitewashed simplicity, Spanish mission style architecture and French farmhouses or villas all appeal to me. Then there’s the rustic elegance and raw materials of the industrial look. My love of the Mid Century Modern era is obvious since I have many beloved pieces of furniture in my collection. Luckily I have plenty of time to work out which way I’m going to go. Decisions, decisions…

HOUSE CALL // the ideal home

Douglas Snelling chair and foot stool, 1957 (timber and synthetic webbing); Douglas Snelling cabinet, 1949 (timber); George Nelson ‘Bubble’ lamp, 1947-70s (plastic and metal)

Robin Boyd ‘House of Tomorrow’, designed 1949 (model made 1992)

Wolfgang Sievers ‘House of Tomorrow’ photographs, 1949 (printed 1990)

Grant and Mary Featherston ‘Numero IV’ lounge suite, 1973-74 (polyurethane foam, ABS plastic and wool); Grant and Mary Featherston dining setting, 1969 (stem, plastic, timber, metal, rubber and fabric); Korban/Flaubert ‘Swaylamp’ floor lamp, 2002 (background); Marc Newson ‘Helice’ floor lamp, 1993 (foreground)

Catherine O’Donnell ‘Sirius Topography (series)’, 2018 (3M vinyl tape 471)

Mid century modern style made a comeback years ago and it’s not going away any time soon and for good reason – great design. I recently saw The Ideal Home exhibition and although it’s very small, it’s worth it if you’re in the area (there’s a larger second site at MAAS Powerhouse in Ultimo). The exhibit shows a slice of history with examples of what a 20th century Australian home looked like with furnishings and household items from the MAAS Collection.

In this era Australia had one of the highest rates of home ownership in the world and suburbs grew quickly. Modern technology and mass manufacturing made goods readily available to consumers and time saving products allowed more leisure. While modernist designers created trends in architecture, interiors and design internationally, Australian pioneers made their own mark. Architect Robin Boyd’s creations are featured as well as iconic furniture designers Grant and Mary Featherston.

Another interesting and unexpected element was the installation of drawings of the Sirius brutalist apartment block. I’ve written before about the threat of redevelopment that the iconic building is facing in my Save Our Sirius post. Catherine O’Donnell has covered the walls with tape outlines of the Sirius footprint, floor plans and elevations to showcase this treasure in a fresh way.

Australians embraced mid century modern as it represented comfort, style and function. 100 years later it is a lifestyle that we still aspire to today.

INSTA-JAM // 2018 flew

        

Usually I post a visual diary and show a snapshot from each month at the end of the year, but 2018 flew by and before you know it we’re at the end of January 2019. It’s a little late but here are some highlights from my Instagram that I hope you enjoy and feel free to browse my feed. I have to say that I used to be much more consistent and I think we all go through that social media fatigue at some stage. It is still a great medium to express yourself and connect with people but I’m taking Marie Kondo’s ‘KonMari’ approach – only if it sparks joy!

MASTERSTROKE // poster poetry

Banksy has become world famous for his political street art but the mystery behind his identity garners just as much interest as his art. I’ve come across posters around the streets of Sydney with profound words but the creators remain anonymous. Sometimes the messaging is simple or has a satirical take with dark humour but the reader can interpret it to their own lives. It’s such a shame that council often removes them, like this second photo I took in Surry Hills years ago which is sadly gone. I came across the first poster recently on a wall in Oxford Street near the cinema, so I’m hoping it stays there for people to see. Coming across these poetic gems not only makes your journey more interesting but also gives you something to think about.

WEEKEND WRAP // vinyl dreams

Being a creative I keep adding my plans to a growing checklist of future projects and business concepts. While I’ve always liked the idea of a book shop/café, it’s my love of music and pubs which makes a record store/bar the ultimate dream. Since there’s so many other things in the pipeline this has been just a pipe dream. Mojo Record Bar has done this perfectly, an underground bar located in the heart of Sydney that has been open since 2012. It has a cool vibe and even cooler playlist with great drinks and food. At the entrance there’s a retro record store with racks of new and pre-loved vinyl records and bar stools to sit and drink while browsing.

I’m getting nostalgic here but this place takes me back to the days of spending hours at music stores with friends. I grew up on cult movies like Empire Records wanting to be Liv Tyler so much that I even wore a mini kilt, fluffy sweater and boots (which I still have as I can’t part with them!). Then it was High Fidelity where I wanted to hang with the guys at Championship Vinyl and date John Cusack (who I still want to date!). Since neither of these film plots are happening in my real life, I’ll live out these fantasies at Mojo while I get to work on the rest of my list.

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