A VISUAL LIFE | Creative Direction + Design

TUCKER TIME // india v australia

India v Australia – sounds like cricket right? So with the COVID-19 pandemic still in full force across most countries, many of us aren’t venturing out as much as we used to. Lots of restaurants and cafés are offering takeaway or delivery options which is great but I’m still cooking a lot. The extra time to plan meals has allowed me to be more creative and try cooking dishes I’ve never made before. I thought I’d experiment with making a traditional dish that represents a country’s culture and cuisine. This cauliflower tikka masala was a delicious vegetarian version to represent India, and I also added potatoes (recipe here). Sausage rolls were an obvious choice for Australia but I swapped the sausage mince for lamb and used carrots, celery and sweet potato as they were the vegetables I had on hand (recipe here). It was such a great test match that I still can’t pick a winner…

MASTERSTROKE // colour block

Pardon the pun but I couldn’t help myself! Wandering around suburban ‘blocks’ to find this gorgeous art using ‘colour blocking’ turned out to be a perfect combination. This was a fashion trend where an outfit revolves around a palette of multiple solid colours, usually in bold and bright shades.

The first image in Rozelle has window-like panels with murals of people peeking out to reveal themselves or parts of their faces. Painting these in black and white gives them contrast and depth to the colourful background. The second photo is in Ultimo and is an architectural piece reflecting the surrounding city buildings. Located on the industrial historic site of the former rail line, it has now been converted to a pedestrian pathway and cycle way known as The Goods Line. These graphic and abstract designs follow the ‘colour block’ style and brighten up these walls while adding character to the area.

 

STREETSCAPES // callan park

The changing of seasons from autumn into winter has made it perfect to go for walks on the weekend. Callan Park is a vast parkland covering 61 hectares across Rozelle, Lilyfield and down to Iron Cove. This gorgeous heritage-listed site has beautiful landscaped gardens you can wander through, complemented by city and harbour views.

Originally built in 1885 as Rozelle Psychiatric Hospital, it closed in 2008. There are countless historic sandstone buildings, some that are still being used but many of them are abandoned and derelict. It has faced demolition because of the decay, but locals and a volunteer group are fighting to protect it. There have been proposals to include more recreational facilities to add to the sporting grounds and picnic areas.

This idyllic spot is a great place to exercise, catch up with friends or take a guided tour. Events and exhibitions are frequently held to not only bring the community together but to also let the public enjoy this special place.

DEAR DIARY // earth day 2020

Marking 50 years today is Earth Day 2020 and the theme for this year is climate action. It seems even more relevant now with everything the world is going through with COVID-19. Apart from the obvious health threat, there are the human challenges of social distancing, changes to the way we live and the economic repercussions. It has been well documented how the effects of closing down factories, restricting air travel and limited car usage has drastically improved the pollution in the air, oceans and waterways. Since self isolating, I think most of us have been far more careful about waste and more thoughtful of actual needs over wants. Once the quarantines are lifted, it will be interesting to see if we continue this conscious thinking as individuals. Hopefully the companies and manufacturers also have a rethink about their own practices and learn from these lessons. Every action can make an impact, so if we are enlightened after this we can all bring about change and strive for a new future.

TUCKER TIME // conscious cooking

I feel conflicted about what I should post since we are in the midst of the coronavirus crisis that is changing life as we know it. The tragic pandemic is evolving every day with people all over the world in lockdown or self isolation. Staying at home is the best way to stop the spread of the virus and it’s a simple thing to do. Being isolated allows us to reflect on how we normally live and changes we need to make to adapt to the new normal (for now anyway). Being more mindful as individuals will hopefully make us more aware to prepare for a better future as a society.

I’m generally good with the way I shop and prepare meals, by trying to keep waste minimal and using all my produce. However I’m even more conscious now of letting food spoil, especially since I want there to be plenty of supplies for everyone while also limiting my trips to the supermarket. I’ve searched online for ways to prepare and freeze various fruits and vegetables that I can use at a later time. I had some white cabbage, kale, carrots and celery left so I made this Japanese vegetable pancake stack (recipe here) served with an Asian inspired coleslaw.

Everybody used to always complain of never having enough spare time and now we do. Although it is a stressful situation for most, especially with the threat to our health and uncertainty around finances. Take care of yourself, appreciate your loved ones and try to enjoy the simple pleasures.

TYPE-RIGHTER // state library

Visiting the State Library of New South Wales is always an enjoyable experience and the Mitchell Vestibule quote engraved in the sandstone foyer is a perfect example of classic type that resonates. It hints at the treasures nestled inside the oldest library in Australia that was established in 1826. There is an extensive range of heritage-listed special collections and references, plus my love for reading makes the library a nostalgic haven. Beautiful vintage books are on display with stunning cover designs and elaborate illustrations, providing much inspiration for artists, designers and typographers.

There are multiple exhibitions at any given time on interesting subjects and they are open to the public for free. Sydney Elders by Wiradjuri/Kamilaroi artist Jonathan Jones, tells the stories of four Aboriginal elders (Uncle Chicka, Aunty Esme, Aunty Sandra, Uncle Dennis) with personal accounts of growing up in Sydney, their ancestors, as well as their contribution and legacy in our city. Another exhibit that was impressive and well curated was Dead Central. Taking you back to 19th century Sydney when there was a vast cemetery that opened in 1820, exactly where Central Station now stands. I never knew that a major burial ground with over 30,000 bodies was cleared in 1901 to make way for the station, and I don’t think many other Sydneysiders know this about the historic site. To begin with there is the clever use of type printed on black tape in two lines like a train track running along the hallway leading to the entrance. All the signage, backdrops, photography and displays are beautifully designed and complement the audio recordings and video reels perfectly.

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